Comparative Media Law and Ethics by Tim Crook

Companion website for

COMPARATIVE MEDIA LAW & ETHICS

by TIM CROOK

to be published by Routledge on 15th December 2009

For details of the book, please visit Routledge.

Author's profile at Goldsmiths, University of London

 

Tim Crook Biography


Tim Crook is a journalist, author, director, academic and broadcaster who has pioneered developments in radio journalism, radio drama, and campaigned for freedom of expression for journalists in the United Kingdom. While presenting an overnight programme on LBC Radio in London he became one of the first broadcasters to announce and confirm the death of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997. For nearly 20 years he has developed the teaching of the practice and theory of radio, scriptwriting, and media law and ethics in undergraduate and postgraduate courses at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Tim Crook

Early Life

Tim Crook is the third son of Captain John H Crook, an infantry officer in the Hallamshires Battalion of the York and Lancaster Regiment during the Second World War, who fought at the Battle of Normandy, played rugby union for Liverpool and pursued a post war career in the Foreign Office and legal profession as a solicitor. Tim’s great uncle, Thomas Heald, was an infantry officer in the Great War, was awarded the Military Cross, and an amateur golf champion. Extracts from his personal diary between 1914-18 were published in Subalterns of the Foot: Three World War I Diaries of Officers of the Cheshire Regiment, a book written by his daughter Anne Wolff and published by Square One in 1992. Tim’s great, great, grand uncle, Joseph Crook, was the radical liberal MP for Bolton from 1852 to 1861 who campaigned for better pay and conditions for women in the Lancashire bleaching industry, sponsored black Americans seeking their freedom from slavery, and helped found the Bolton Institute- now Bolton University. Another ancestor, Lieutenant Philip Joseph Crook, died in Palestine in 1917 while serving with the Lancashire Yeomanry.

Tim Crook’s mother Sheila was a fashion artist and antiques dealer and her father was the town clerk to Up Holland Urban District Council near Wigan.

Tim was brought up in the South of France and Chelsea, attended Marlborough Primary in Chelsea and the Italia Conti Drama school in Clapham until the age of 11. He was head choirboy at Chelsea Old Church, and attended Westminster City School. He reported and wrote articles for Young Liberal community newspaper publications. He was first employed as a barman in Chelsea, bar manager in Soho, gardener and road-sweeper for the City of London, and leathergoods shop manager in the West End, before his freelance writing and commitment to journalism led to his acceptance in 1978-79, at the age of 19, on what became the postgraduate course in broadcast journalism at the London College of Printing under the supervision of Dr Fred Hunter and Professor John Herbert. He was trained in the same year as the former GLA member and current MP for Ealing and Acton North, Angie Bray, and the BBC’s employment correspondent Martin Shankleman. During the course he freelanced for LBC in London, the BBC World Service and completed investigative documentary projects on the music business and punishment regimes on children in care, which were broadcast on BBC Radio 1 and LBC Radio in London. In one of the first radio interviews he conducted, the Spanish flamenco guitarist Paco Peña agreed to perform for several minutes, and the event was broadcast on LBC’s evening arts programme.

Journalism

He worked as a reporter and newsreader at Radio Tees in Cleveland between 1979 and 1981 alongside the current head of BBC Journalism Helen Boaden and the BBC’s North America Editor Mark Mardell. He originated a networked documentary on the impact of unemployment, which was transmitted in 1980 when the country’s dole queue reached two million for the first time since the 1930s, reported on the Alexander Keilland oil rig disaster, and the enquiry into the murders of the Yorkshire Ripper, Peter Sutcliffe. He returned to London as a specialist freelance covering national and international stories in London for BBC Scotland including the London dimension to the Argentine invasion of the Falkland Islands. In London he was on call to BBC Radio Scotland to cover the major stories of the day, which often included strikes and terrorist incidents including the murder of Scotland Yard’s bomb disposal officer Kenneth Howarth in Oxford Street. It was while BBC Scotland assigned him to cover a long-running cannabis smuggling trial involving Howard Marks (who was acquitted) that he was asked by IRN/LBC to take on the role of the network and station’s correspondent at the Old Bailey. He covered the leading trials and crime stories for the next 15 years and built up a news agency that specialised in providing reporting services for broadcasting at the Central Criminal Court and Royal Courts of Justice. He also filed for the new Independent newspaper when it opened in 1986. A special archive of LBC/IRN journalism for the period 1973 to 1996 contains over 260 of his radio reports. One of his more memorable recordings was his improvised ad-libbing in Newgate Street when a man from Croydon, protesting about a planning dispute with his local council, decided to drive his tank into the City of London and alarmed armed police officers escorting IRA terrorist trial defendants. His other broadcasting work included on screen television reporting for Newsroom South East and ITV regional programmes. He researched and supported investigative projects into the criminal justice system for ITN and BBC television news. His investigative journalism into forensic science standards in criminal trials led to an adjournment debate in the House of Commons and a nomination for Sony Radio Reporter of the Year in 1984. In 1982 he negotiated the first UK broadcasting from the Lord Chief Justice’s court at the Royal Courts of Justice when he was allowed to record the valedictory ceremony of the celebrated Master of the Rolls Lord Denning. His investigative journalism into a London kidnapping case in 1985 and the airing of his radio documentary on the subject was reviewed in national newspapers [Radio The right rewards for sound success (Reviews) David Wade. The Times Saturday, May 25, 1985; pg. 19; Issue 62147; col G] and resulted in a nomination for most creative use of radio at the UK Sony Awards of that year. [PAUL FERRIS. (1985, December 29). Quest for real lives :RADIO. The Observer (1901- 2003),19.] He covered the key miscarriage of justice scandals of the late 1980s and 1990s and his reporting of the Birmingham Six appeals won a reporting award at the International Radio Festival of New York in 1991. His journalistic campaigning against secrecy in the legal system was supported by the NUJ, NCCL and Independent newspaper and resulted in a Campaign for Freedom of Information Award in 1987 and legislation providing a right of appeal for news organisations against Crown Court reporting bans and secret hearings. On two occasions he presented appeals against reporting bans before the Court of Appeal with his journalist colleague Caroline Godwin. The last case they fought in 1994 challenged the holding of an entire Crown Court Trial in camera. The Judge was persuaded to announce the sentence in open court only after he visited the court and sent a protesting message via the judge’s clerk. The Lord Chief Justice of England at the time, Lord Peter Taylor, Mr Justice McPherson (The Stephen Lawrence Enquiry) and Mrs Justice Steel heard the reporters’ challenge in camera and to this day the outcome of the case remains sealed. It may never be known because of the shredding of secret court ruling documents.

In other court censorship battles he was represented by Geoffrey Robertson QC, Heather Rogers QC, Sir Andrew Nicol QC (now a High Court Judge), Keir Starmer QC (The Director of Public Prosecutions) and John Wadham, Legal director of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, and former legal director of Liberty. In 1997 at a conference convened by the charity Mediawise he warned of the injustices and problems of secret justice in the family courts. He has also submitted evidence to the House of Commons Select Committee on Culture Media & Sport’s enquiry into press standards, libel and privacy. He provided a detailed proposal for a restorative justice solution to the problems of media abuse of power and the chilling effect of media laws. He had previously submitted evidence to the committee on their enquiries into the funding of the BBC and the regulatory and executive decisions that led to the demise of ITN’s flagship programme News At Ten. His British Journalism Review article on the protection of journalists’ sources in the wake of the Dr David Kelly/Andrew Gilligan/Hutton Enquiry affair is frequently cited. He writes periodical bulletins commenting on media law that have been referenced in the journalism and media law field. In 2013, he was accepted as a member of the Chartered Institute of Journalists and serves on its Professional Practices Board.

Broadcasting Presentation

In the early 1980s Tim presented LBC’s Nightline phone-in programme for several months, but turned down the offer of a full-time contract to concentrate on his investigative and campaigning journalism in the legal system. From 1996 to 2002 he did work as a full-time presenter on LBC 1152 when it was owned by GWR and ITN. He did relief presentation for Drive-time, Dawn Traders, and the Clive Bull programme. For twelve years (1989-2002) he presented and produced LBC Drama Showcase, that for this period was the only regularly scheduled drama programme on UK independent radio. He originated, produced and presented the pioneering News Line programme, the first in the UK to use audio-streaming, ‘listen again’, and news links with web-text. In 2000 it won a Silver Medal at the International Radio Festival of New York for best regularly scheduled news and current affairs programme. His main work though was as a weekend overnight presenter. He anchored more than 6 hours of live analysis on the night Diana, Princess of Wales died in a car accident in Paris. He was credited with being the first UK radio broadcaster to announce her death and the first UK broadcaster to provide official confirmation. The radio critic of the Spectator complimented his decision to delay the announcement until he had confirmed the reliability of his sources. [The Spectator March 24, 2001 ‘Many a slip’; Radio by Michael Vestey; Pg. 61]

Drama

From 1987 his collaboration with playwright and director Richard Shannon resulted in the establishment of the UK’s first specialist independent radio drama production company. IRDP pioneered new formats in audio drama and originated new writing schemes providing an alternative platform for radio drama outside the BBC. The company originated the marketing of new radio drama in the spoken word market with an exclusive brand marketed by W H Smiths. Co-productions with NPR in the USA resulted in award-winning adaptations of classical literature being broadcast in London and US public radio including the dramatisation of Sherlock Holmes stories and novels starring Edward Petherbridge, the dramatisation of Joseph Conrad’s novels The Secret Agent and Heart of Darkness, and the award winning dramatisation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula starring Kenneth Haigh and Don Henderson. These productions were distributed by satellite from NPR Washington D.C. on NPR Playhouse, a programme strand that was discontinued in 2002. IRDP produced the first UK radio plays of Simon Beaufoy (Saddam’s Arms LBC and independent radio 1993) and Martin McDonagh (The Wolf and the Woodcutter, LBC, 1996). Both plays were directed by Richard Shannon and won nominations and awards at Prix Futura and the International Radio Festival of New York. The company produced all 52 episodes of the audio drama series Magical Music Box, a science fiction serial promoting an appreciation of classical music to young people and published by Marshall Cavendish. IRDP pioneered Internet and Web-based audio drama projects and created the world’s first ‘Internet Play of the Month’ in 1997, [The Stage September 28, 2000 ‘Tune in to some sites worth seeing’ by Suzi Pritchard: Pg. 26] which attracted award nominations from the UK’s Radio Academy and the International Festival of New York for technical innovations in broadcasting. [The Guardian (London) December 13, 1997 ‘Wave riding: Missing the Net’ by Anne Karpf, The Guardian Features Page; Pg. 7] Innovative LBC projects included short story dramas on social and political dilemmas to stimulate interactive phone-in programme discussion with listeners determining the final twist to the plot, surround sound design, varying lengths of episodic serialisation from five minutes, ten minutes, half hour and one hour sequences for commercial radio programming.[The Daily Telegraph (London) September 30, 2003, ‘Frightfully old hat’ by Gillian Reynolds on Radio: Pg. 16] The company produced a one-minute promotional series of Magical Music Box for Classic FM. IRDP originated and ran two new writing projects for radio drama and theatre. The Woolwich Young Radio Playwrights Competition (1990-1997) was launched with Melvyn Bragg as patron. Regional arts council funding supported a London Radio Playwrights Festival (1989-2000) generating workshops and productions of short story and full length new writing for radio and live stage presentations at the BAC and Tricycle theatres in London.

IRDP’s theatre arm On Air pioneered and originated multimedia presentations of sound, stage, design and performance of new writing in theatre spaces at the Cottesloe of The Royal National, Cambridge, BAC, Red Lion and Tristan Bates. Writers, actors, directors, sound designers and musicians secured scores of awards and nominations in IRDP productions at the New York Festivals, Prix Italia, Sony Radio Awards, and Writers’ Guild.
Tim Crook sound designed a unique production of Samuel Beckett’s All That Fall at the BAC with the director Tom Morris in 1996. The production was presented in total darkness with the actors performing in a specially designed black box space so that when they moved they generated surface and spot effects to a multi-dimensional sound ambience produced through two digital surround sound fields and four stereo sound fields. The sound design was driven by 20 different speakers, and supporting sub-whoofers. His direction and production of Andrew Smith’s ‘Still Stationery’ was UK independent broadcasting’s entry to Prix Italia in Naples in 1996 and it was the first surround sound audio drama to be submitted. The play was shortlisted for the Best Radio Fiction prize. A previous IRDP production of ‘Vissi d’arte’ by Paul Sirett and directed by Richard Shannon, had been co-produced by Tim Crook and received a ‘special mention’ at Prix Italia in 1991. Tim Crook had been the workshop leader who had directed a group of professional actors to perform the first five minutes of Paul’s script a year earlier. Tim directed one thirty minute play for BBC Radio 4, ‘Much Like Yourself’ written by Anna Hashmi starring the late Charlotte Coleman, transmitted in 1994 and 1995, and which is archived in the British Library’s sound collection. He directed the early radio plays of television scriptwriter James Payne and novelist William Sutton ‘George Q’. He has been a vice-president of an audio drama producing company based in New York City and periodically participates in British film and drama productions as script editor and consultant. He remains a great enthusiast for audio drama in all forms and teaches a successful postgraduate course in ‘Sound Story Telling: Intertextuality of Narrative’ at Goldsmiths, University of London for MA Scriptwriting and Radio students.

Tim Crook’s 1989 free verse dramatisation of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness is referenced as an Internet resource in the latest edition of Cliff’s Notes on Conrad’s Heart of Darkness & The Secret Sharer.

 

Academia

In 1990, through an introduction by Richard Shannon, he started visiting lecturing at Goldsmiths College, University of London and from 1992 has convened the MA Radio course that provides a unique twin track of professional radio journalism education and creative documentary and radio drama. He also founded and developed the college’s teaching of media law and ethics in the Department of Media & Communications. Since 1982 he has been a visiting lecturer to the BBC in media law. and originated interactive problem scenario workshops for the BBC’s journalists. He was appointed a full time lecturer at Goldsmiths in 1993, Senior Lecturer in 2000, and Reader in 2013. He has been the recipient of two fellowships from the College’s Centre for excellence in learning and teaching, a Peake Award for teaching in 2009, and was appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and Manufactures 1998 and the Higher Education Academy in 2004. Despite leaving school at 16, Tim Crook has studied for and been awarded five higher educational diplomas and degrees in Literature, European Humanities, Film and Television History, Law, and Criminology. He is regularly interviewed on BBC World Service news and current affairs programmes on issues of international media law and ethics and in January 2010 the Daily Telegraph commissioned him to write a feature length article on how the UK Supreme Court is ruling on cases affecting private lives and the public interest. He has participated in BBC Radio 4 and Radio 3 documentaries about communications and radio history. He originated, researched, provided archive and key interviews for documentaries on the Electrophone, (‘Down the Wires’ 2006) Mabel Constanduros (‘The Late Mrs Buggins’ 2006) and Great War propaganda recordings. ‘The Sounds of Flanders’ 2007 - The programme was presented by Frank Gardner. During the invasion of Iraq in 2003 he provided analysis and consultation to the Foreign Press Association in London on the history and practice of propaganda techniques and his daily briefings were followed by national and international news organisations. He also presents papers at academic conferences home and abroad. and co-organised with radio drama scholar Alan Beck four academic conferences on radio drama between 1999 and 2002.

Author

His textbook International Radio Journalism, History, Theory and Practice (Routledge 1997) has influenced the recognition and archiving of LBC and IRN programming by Bournemouth University. Radio Drama Theory and Practice (Routledge 1999) has been a best selling book on audio drama theory and practice and is catalogued in more than 600 libraries throughout the world. Comparative Media Law & Ethics (2009) is having a major impact in the theoretical framework for teaching the subject in universities and outlines restorative justice solutions for criminal and civil wrongs in journalism and media publication. He is completing the writing of the academic texts The Sound Handbook and Writing Audio Drama (Routledge 2010) which respectively discuss theory and practice in sound production techniques across multimedia as well as advancing ideas and concepts for writing sound narrative and drama in media applications. He was a significant contributor through the writing of eleven articles on BBC Radio history to the Chicago Museum of Communications Encyclopedia of Radio Project.

The Secret Lives of A Secret Agent: The Mysterious Life and Times of Alexander Wilson (Kultura Press 2010 with Second Edition expected in 2014) is the narrative of the discovery of the intelligence operative and author Alexander Wilson whose ‘Leonard Wallace and British Secret Service’ spying novels published in the 1920s and 1930s may have influenced Ian Fleming’s James Bond series. (They lived in the same street in Pimlico in the middle 1930s). Wilson’s writing bridges the John Buchan genre with the more moody and introspective representations of espionage by Graham Greene and John Le Carré. Tim Crook’s five years of research for the literary biography also revealed how Wilson explored the motivation and psychology of terrorism in the novel The Crimson Dacoit and the impact of a mole infiltrated into the very heart of a counter-intelligence agency. Wilson was also an accomplished writer of crime and romance fiction.

The unique aspect of Alexander Wilson’s story is that his writing career was developed against the backdrop of a life of fabrication and multiple identities. It can be argued that his positive depiction of the global power and prowess of British Secret Service operations had a propagandist impact.

Wilson pioneered a positive representation of women intelligence officers and agents in novels such as Microbes of Power (1937) and Wallace Intervenes (1939) He introduced innovative themes in spy fiction including the deployment of the male honey trap, ghost intelligence networks, and eavesdropping technology.

The Secret Lives of A Secret Agent unfolds the odyssey of his son, the actor and poet Mike Shannon who with his son Richard asked Tim in 2005 to help unravel the mysteries of his father’s life. In the process Tim Crook discovered that Alexander Wilson was the author of 24 published novels, 3 academic books and 4 unpublished manuscripts. He had an extraordinary biographical back-story of adventure, tragedy and a career in the secret world that might have spanned the Great Game in North West India, 1930s Europe and war-time London. The project also helped Mike discover four living half brothers and a half sister he was unaware of, and brought together several generations of a large extended family who are related to one of the most remarkable spy fiction writers of the twentieth century. The professional drama background of Mike, his children Richard and Kate chimed with the discovery that the youngest child of one of his half brothers is the actor and film producer Ruth Wilson. Mike Shannon died in December 2010, a few weeks after the publication of the biography. New revelations about his father's life in India and service with MI6 between 1939 and 1942 will be included in the book's second edition.

Internet Sources

MA Radio Goldsmiths profile.
Announcing death of Diana, Princess of Wales on LBC in 1997.
Contribution to BBC R3 documentary in 2010 ‘The Pleasure Phone’ - The 19th Century iphone.
Investigative journalism into work of forensic scientist Alan Clift. Adjournment debate House of Commons 1984.
Goldsmiths, University of London profile.
Radio Drama at amazon.co.uk.
Online review of Radio Drama.
Extracts from Radio Drama on google.
Comparative Media Law & Ethics at amazon.co.uk.
International Radio Journalism at amazon.co.uk.
Review by Richard Rudin in ‘Radio Magazine’.
Sound Handbook at amazon.co.uk.
At Independent Radio Drama Productions.
Tim Crook, books published by Routledge.
Principles of writing radio drama- brief web guide.
Jon Slattery on Tim Crook’s blog re: Torture CIA/MI5 case.
Memorandum evidence to House of Commons Select Committee, culture, media & sport enquiry into press standards, libel and privacy.
Memorandum evidence to House of Commons Select Committee, culture, media & sport ‘Whatever Happened to News At Ten?” March 2000.
British Journalism Review: Is Your Source Ever Safe? 2003.
231 search results at BUFVC IRN/LBC archive 1973 to 1996.
Past LBC presenters.
Campaigning against reporting restrictions and legal secrecy 1985. Campaign for Freedom of Information. Article by Adrian Wilkes.
Recipient of Freedom of Information Award 1987.
Submission to Child Exploitation and Media Forum conference 1997 on the dangers of secrecy in family and youth courts.
Participation in ‘Sound of Flanders’ BBC Radio Four documentary 2007 review.
Documentary presented by Frank Gardner on the sound propaganda of the Great War.
The History and Development of Independent Radio Journalism in Britain by Tim Crook.
Co-organiser with Alan Beck of 'How sound is radio drama research?', address, Fifth Radio Drama Conference, 9 February 2002.
American University in Paris Conference 2008 Tim Crook, Goldsmiths: The Moral and Political Philosophical Contextualisation of Teaching Media Law & Ethics at Goldsmiths, University of London.
Future of Radio is downloadable. Quoted in wired.com article 2005.
Directed BBC Radio 4 play by Anna Hashmi 1994.
Radio drama enthusiasm and support of acknowledged by Sonic Society blog.
Secrets of real-life MI6 spook revealed in new book.
New Light on Abdullah Yusuf Ali - Tim Crook's biography of Alexander Wilson.
Bigamist, writer, soldier, spy...the truth about Ruth Wilson's grandfather.
Alexander Wilson (writer and spy).
Writer, lover, soldier, spy: The strange and secretive life of Alexander Wilson.
The Secret Lives Of A Secret Agent: The Mysterious Life and Times of Alexander Wilson - amazon.co.uk review.
The Secret Lives Of A Secret Agent: The Mysterious Life and Times of Alexander Wilson - W.H Smiths.
The Secret Lives Of A Secret Agent: The Mysterious Life and Times of Alexander Wilson by Tim Crook - Kultura Press.
The Secret Lives Of A Secret Agent: The Mysterious Life and Times of Alexander Wilson by Tim Crook - Waterstones.
The Secret Lives Of A Secret Agent by Tim Crook. Books by Goldsmiths academics.

Newspaper, news agency and magazine sources



The Times, October 11, 2010 Monday, Edition 1; National Edition,SECTION: FEATURES; Pg. 55,56, LENGTH: 2340 words 'Four wives, seven children and a life of lies; Alexander Wilson was a Second World War hero and a leading novelist, as well as a bigamist and a cad. His grandson, Sam Wilson, pieces together his family's incredible past'.
The Daily Telegraph (London) January 29, 2010 Friday Edition 1; National Edition ‘PRIVATE LIVES, PUBLIC INTEREST’; BYLINE: Tim Crook SECTION: FEATURES; Pg. 25 LENGTH: 1353 words
Media Lawyer, December 21, 2009 Monday ‘PRIVACY AND THE UK REACH THE STRASBOURG CROSSROADS’ SECTION: PRIVACY; Tim Crook 1083 words.
THE DAILY TELEGRAPH(LONDON) September 30, 2003, Tuesday Frightfully old hat BYLINE: By Gillian Reynolds on Radio SECTION: Pg. 16.
Agence France Presse – English September 26, 2003 Friday Kelly affair leaves BBC bruised, but credibility intact BYLINE: ERIC THOMAS SECTION: International News LENGTH: 630 words DATELINE: LONDON, Sept 26
Agence France Presse – English April 1, 2003 Tuesday London's media offensive on Iraq comes under fire BYLINE: CATHERINE MARCIANO SECTION: International News LENGTH: 551 words DATELINE: LONDON, April 1
IPS-Inter Press Service March 20, 2003, Thursday IRAQ: U.S. LOSING PROPAGANDA WAR, EXPERT SAYS BYLINE: By Sanjay Suri LENGTH: 857 words DATELINE: LONDON, Mar. 20
The Spectator March 24, 2001 Many a slip; Radio BYLINE: Michael Vestey SECTION: Pg. 61 LENGTH: 806 words
The Stage September 28, 2000 Tune in to some sites worth seeing;
The Internet provides increasing opportunities for radio fans to download clips of shows or even listen to them live. Suzi Pritchard gives her pick of the best sites
SECTION: Pg. 26 LENGTH: 986 words.
The Stage February 24, 2000 This state of independence; Broadcasting feature; John Martland discovers how the BBC's links with independent radio production companies are pushing innovation to the fore BYLINE: John Martland SECTION: Pg. 24 LENGTH: 917 words.
The Stage October 07, 1999 Drama commissioner for R4; BYLINE: By Alexa Baracaia SECTION: Pg. 3 LENGTH: 221 words.
The Stage August 05, 1999 Making a crisis out of radio drama; Tim Crook SECTION: Pg. 20 LENGTH: 1042 words.
The Age (Melbourne, Australia) October 26, 1998 Monday Late Edition;The Martians Are Back! BYLINE: Darrin Farrant SECTION: NEWS; Features; Pg. 11 LENGTH: 1418 words.
The Independent (London) June 23, 1998, Tuesday Media: Why every child needs a media manager; Children must be protected from the press, whatever the sins of their fathers or mothers. BYLINE: Jaclyn Moriarty SECTION: FEATURES; Page 19 LENGTH: 962 words.
The Times August 16, 1994, Tuesday Hearing parties on gagging order SECTION: Features LENGTH: 749 words Court of Appeal. Regina v Central Criminal Court, Ex parte Godwin and Crook Before Lord Justice Glidewell, Mr Justice Blofeld and Mr Justice Buxton (Judgment July 29).
The Independent (London) July 30, 1994, Saturday Journalists lose appeal over ban on naming child-killers SECTION: HOME NEWS PAGE; Page 2 LENGTH: 197 words.
Evening Standard (London) July 19, 1994 Court bid to name parents of tragic child
BYLINE: Paul Cheston SECTION: Pg. 20 LENGTH: 520 words.
Press Association July 19, 1994, Tuesday JOURNALISTS CHALLENGE BAN ON NAMING CHILD KILLERS BYLINE: Jan Colley, PA News SECTION: HOME NEWS LENGTH: 378 words.
Press Association May 10, 1994, Tuesday DRACULA BITES BACK FOR RADIO COMPANY BYLINE: Rob Scully, Showbusiness Correspondent, PA News SECTION: HOME NEWS LENGTH: 202 words.
Marcel Berlins. (1994, April 5). Write large. The Guardian (1959-2003),A21. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1146620442).
Evening Standard (London) March 31, 1994 Journalists' anger as courts sit in secret BYLINE: Keith Dovkants SECTION: Pg. 19 LENGTH: 467 words.
The Independent (London) March 25, 1994, Friday Journalists question ruling on secret trial SECTION: HOME NEWS PAGE; Page 8 LENGTH: 185 words
The Times March 25, 1994, Friday Spirit of Kafka haunts The Trial SECTION: Home news LENGTH: 273 words
Russell Twisk. (1993, August 15). Radio Russell Twisk Creative boys across the river. The Observer (1901- 2003),55. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1461569732).
Russell Twisk. (1993, January 24). Making a crisis out of drama. The Observer (1901- 2003),57. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1224293172).
The Times February 20, 1992, Thursday Inside insight leaves playwright a runner-up
BYLINE: By Simon Tait, Arts Correspondent SECTION: Home news LENGTH: 376 words.
What a drama! Now listen to this . . (1991, July 21). The Observer (1901- 2003),63. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1224125412).
Calling all young radio writers [review of radio drama workshops at the Brighton Festival.] (1991, March 14). The Guardian (1959-2003),31. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1150011582).
Russel Twisk. (1990, October 7). Bleak encounters on the airwaves. The Observer (1901- 2003),71. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1461467702).
The Independent (London) March 23, 1990, Friday RADIO / The three ad play; Martin Wroe reports on a company which aims at replacing seamless pop with radio drama BYLINE: By MARTIN WROE SECTION: ARTS PAGE; Page 14 LENGTH: 1064 words
Sid Smith. (1990, January 22). Dramatic intervention :.. The Guardian (1959-2003),23. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1142261372).
The Guardian (London) January 22, 1990 Media: Dramatic intervention - A deal with the Woolwich has revitalised commercial radio drama. Sid Smith reports BYLINE: By SID SMITH LENGTH: 686 words.
Russell Twisk. (1990, January 14). Drama that fits between the ad breaks :Radio. The Observer (1901- 2003),62. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1223459472).
Clare Dyer Legal Correspondent. (1989, November 11). Closed courts challenge fails. The Guardian (1959-2003),4. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1128973082).
The Independent November 11 1989, Saturday Judges dismiss 'open justice' challenge to secret hearings BYLINE: HEATHER MILLS, Court Correspondent SECTION: Home News ; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 413 words.
Press Association November 10, 1989, Friday JUDGES REJECT 'SECRET' COURT CHALLENGES BYLINE: Jan Colley, Press Association SECTION: LAW COURT NEWS LENGTH: 545 words.
Gareth Parry. (1989, October 13). Secret cases challenged. The Guardian (1959-2003),3. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1131204142).
Susan Tirbutt. (1989, October 13). Open justice goes on trial: Friday People. The Guardian (1959-2003),3. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1131204152).
The Independent October 13 1989, Friday Orders for secret trials challenged BYLINE: HEATHER MILLS, Courts Correspondent LENGTH: 427 words
The Times (London) October 13 1989, Friday Judges ban reports on legal challenge to 'secrecy' orders BYLINE: FRANCES GIBB, Legal Affairs Correspondent SECTION: Issue 63524. LENGTH: 498 words
The Times (London) October 13 1989, Friday Judges ban reports on legal challenge to 'secrecy' orders BYLINE: FRANCES GIBB, Legal Affairs Correspondent SECTION: Issue 63524. LENGTH: 498 words.
Press Association October 11, 1989, Wednesday LORD CHIEF JUSTICE TO HEAR SECRET COURT HEARING CHALLENGE SECTION: LAW COURT NEWS
LENGTH: 195 words.
The Times (London) October 11 1989, Wednesday Secret test of judges' secrecy ruling; Media & Marketing BYLINE: FRANCES GIBB SECTION: Issue 63522.
LENGTH: 311 words.
The Guardian (London) September 22, 1989 Secrecy challenge can be heard in open court, rules Lord Lane BYLINE: By CLARE DYER, Legal Correspondent LENGTH: 204 words.
Clare Dyer Legal Correspondent. (1989, September 22). Secrecy challenge can be heard in open court, rules Lord Lane. The Guardian (1959-2003),5. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1131150902).
Appeal Court to hear secret session cases. (1989, September 19). The Guardian (1959-2003),3. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1131139142).
The Guardian (London) September 19, 1989 Appeal Court to hear secret session cases
LENGTH: 179 words.
The Independent September 19 1989, Tuesday secrecy appeals to be heard in camera
BYLINE: HEATHER MILLS ECTION: Home News ; Pg. 3 LENGTH: 287 words.
Press Association September 18, 1989, Monday APPEAL COURT TO HEAR PRESS BAN APPEALS SECTION: LAW COURT NEWS LENGTH: 204 words.
The Independent September 13 1989, Wednesday Juror halts trial at cost of 7,200 pounds BYLINE: HEATHER MILLS, Courts Correspondent LENGTH: 319 words.
The Independent September 12 1989, Tuesday Appeal to test law as judge bans Press
BYLINE: HEATHER MILLS LENGTH: 177 words.
The Independent July 31 1989, Monday New rules on right to challenge secret trials condemned BYLINE: PATRICIA WYNN DAVIES, Legal Correspondent SECTION: Home News ; Pg. 5 LENGTH: 547 words.
The Independent July 5 1989, Wednesday Letter: Appeals against in camera orders BYLINE: From Lord MACKAY LENGTH: 548 words.
The Independent June 29 1989, Thursday Letter: Secret justice BYLINE: From TIM CROOK SECTION: 28 June LENGTH: 308 words.
The Independent June 27 1989, Tuesday Secret hearing for rail rebels' strike ban appeal BYLINE: HEATHER MILLS, Courts Correspondent LENGTH: 541 words.
The Independent June 24 1989, Saturday New rules on court secrecy 'restrictive' BYLINE: HEATHER MILLS, Courts Correspondent LENGTH: 573 words.
The Times (London) January 23 1989, Monday Fear's long run; Radio review
BYLINE: DAVID WADE SECTION: Issue 63298. LENGTH: 415 words.
'Pepping up Pepys’. B. A. Young. The Financial Times (London, England), Saturday, October 03, 1987; pg. XXIII; Edition 30,353 (634 words) Category: Arts and Entertainment. Gale Document Number: HS2305002720
‘Different Kinds of Drama on the Air’. B. A. Young. The Financial Times (London, England),Saturday, January 14, 1989; pg. XVII; Edition 30,743 (564 words) Category: Arts and Entertainment. Gale Document Number: HS2305748587
‘Adventure for All-comers’. B. A. Young. The Financial Times (London, England),Saturday, December 30, 1989; pg. XVIII; Edition 31,036 (1147 words)
Category: Reviews Gale Document Number: HS2305819652
‘Some Great Lines’. B. A. Young. The Financial Times (London, England),Saturday, June 23, 1990; pg. XXI; Edition 31,181 (645 words) Category: News. Gale Document Number: HS2304554245
‘Rare Ibsen Saga’. B. A. Young. The Financial Times (London, England),Saturday, March 31, 1990; pg. XIX; Edition 31,113 (644 words). Category: Arts and Entertainment. Gale Document Number: HS2304031084
‘The Working Man's Lot’. B. A Young. The Financial Times (London, England),Saturday, August 18, 1990; pg. XV; Edition 31,229 (770 words)
Category: Arts and Entertainment. Gale Document Number: HS2305017276
‘A Year of Drama’ B. A. Young. The Financial Times (London, England),Saturday, December 29, 1990; pg. XIV; Edition 31,340 (1016 words) Category: Arts and Entertainment. Gale Document Number: HS2304053507
‘Chekhovian References’. B. A. Young. The Financial Times (London, England), Saturday, March 07, 1992; pg. XIX; Edition 31,703 (768 words) . Category: Arts and Entertainment. Gale Document Number: HS2305835978
‘Quiet! Chess’. B. A. Young. The Financial Times (London, England), Saturday, September 11, 1993; pg. XIX; Edition 32,163 (569 words). Category: Reviews. Gale Document Number: HS2304647732
Val Arnold-Forster. (1987, October 31). Chums rush. The Guardian (1959-2003),15. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1314584682).
The Times (London) August 26 1987, Wednesday Press wins freedom to challenge court orders BYLINE: FRANCES GIBB, Legal Affairs Correspondent SECTION: Issue 62857. LENGTH: 356 words.
The Times (London) May 12 1987, Tuesday Right of challenge for Press BYLINE: FRANCES GIBB, Legal Affairs Correspondent SECTION: Issue 62766.
LENGTH: 250 words.
Peter Murtagh. (1987, May 11). Judge's order challenged in Europe :A journalist who found he could not fight a ruling that a witness must remain anonymous has appealed to Strasbourg. Peter Murtagh reports. The Guardian (1959-2003),5. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1148847162).
The Guardian (London) May 11, 1987 Gag on naming witness is challenged: Strasbourg is likely to reverse a judge's ruling that a witness may remain anonymous BYLINE: By PETER MURTAGH LENGTH: 1027 words.
Reporter refuses secrecy pledge. (1987, March 26). The Guardian (1959-2003),4. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1148722792).
Malcolm Dean. (1987, March 11). Channel 4 clears hurdle. The Guardian (1959-2003),4. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1148680102).
Malcolm Dean. (1987, March 10). Reporters pursue court rights. The Guardian (1959-2003),3. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1148677592).
The Guardian (London) January 20, 1987 Hailsham considers press challenge / Lord Chancellor considers review of 1981 Supreme Court Act BYLINE: By MALCOLM DEAN LENGTH: 261 words.
The Times (London) November 4 1986, Tuesday Press wins change in law of contempt BYLINE: FRANCES GIBB, Legal Affairs Correspondent SECTION: Issue 62606. LENGTH: 176 words.
PAUL FERRIS. (1985, December 29). Quest for real lives :RADIO. The Observer (1901- 2003),19. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1227896842).
PAUL FERRIS. (1985, May 26). Buying back Shirley :RADIO. [review of radio documentary by Tim Crook for LBC, London] The Observer (1901- 2003),21. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1227767072).
Radio The right rewards for sound success (Reviews) David Wade. The Times Saturday, May 25, 1985; pg. 19; Issue 62147; col G
Media File... (1984, August 27). The Guardian (1959-2003),7. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1130215372).
Ruling on press curb delayed (Law) The Times Wednesday, Aug 01, 1984; pg. 2; Issue 61898; col H
Court challenge to press curb (news) The Times Tuesday, Jul 31, 1984; pg. 2; Issue 61897; col A
NUJ given permission to fight ban (Law) The Times Saturday, May 26, 1984; pg. 3; Issue 61841; col D
NUJ takes first step to challenge contempt order. (1984, April 19). The Guardian (1959-2003),20. Retrieved June 5, 2010, from ProQuest Historical Newspapers The Guardian and The Observer (1791-2003). (Document ID: 1130463662).
High court challenge to judge's publication ban (Law) By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent.The Times Monday, Apr 16, 1984; pg. 2; Issue 61807; col B
London Day By Day (News) PETERBOROUGH.The Times Friday, Jan 27, 1984; pg. 18; Issue 40002; col D

 

 

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